Being a non-profit doesn’t mean you don’t need resources. You need to rope in more people. You need to raise awareness. You may also need funds – even Mother Teresa got millions of dollars in funding on a regular basis for her Missionaries of Charity organization. People aren’t going to join mainly because you think that you’re doing some good work and people must feel compassionate enough to join you. Yes, that happens but only if you are a very big, very well-known organization having already done stellar work in your field and earned laurels all over the country or all over the world. But if you are a relatively new organization at every front you will need to promote yourself if you want to do some meaningful work in your field. You have to highlight your strengths and requirements. You need to showcase the work that you are doing and the difference your work is making. You will need stories – emotionally moving stories (not made up of course) – to make a real impact on donors, volunteers and resource persons. Writing content for your website or your blog or your email newsletter is an ongoing process. Of course even someone from within your organization can write content for your website but then you will need a dedicated person who can write passionately. You may have to hire that person and that will be costly compared to working with a freelance professional content writer. With a freelance professional content writer writing for your non-profit organization you simply have to pay for the content you get and nothing more. But if you hire an in-house content writer you will have to bear all the associated costs, putting a burden on your already scarce resources.

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Being a non-profit doesn’t mean you don’t need resources. You need to rope in more people. You need to raise awareness. You may also need funds – even Mother Teresa got millions of dollars in funding on a regular basis for her Missionaries of Charity organization. People aren’t going to join mainly because you think that you’re doing some good work and people must feel compassionate enough to join you. Yes, that happens but only if you are a very big, very well-known organization having already done stellar work in your field and earned laurels all over the country or all over the world. But if you are a relatively new organization at every front you will need to promote yourself if you want to do some meaningful work in your field. You have to highlight your strengths and requirements. You need to showcase the work that you are doing and the difference your work is making. You will need stories – emotionally moving stories (not made up of course) – to make a real impact on donors, volunteers and resource persons. Writing content for your website or your blog or your email newsletter is an ongoing process. Of course even someone from within your organization can write content for your website but then you will need a dedicated person who can write passionately. You may have to hire that person and that will be costly compared to working with a freelance professional content writer. With a freelance professional content writer writing for your non-profit organization you simply have to pay for the content you get and nothing more. But if you hire an in-house content writer you will have to bear all the associated costs, putting a burden on your already scarce resources.

NGO/GRO (governmental-related organizations) types can be understood by their orientation and level of how they operate. By orientation Charitable orientation often involves a top-down effort with little participation or input by beneficiaries. It includes NGOs with activities directed toward meeting the needs of the disadvantaged people groups. Service orientation includes NGOs with activities such as the provision of health, family planning or education services in which the programme is designed by the NGO and people are expected to participate in its implementation and in receiving the service. Participatory orientation is characterized by self-help projects where local people are involved particularly in the implementation of a project by contributing cash, tools, land, materials, labour etc. In the classical community development project, participation begins with the need definition and continues into the planning and implementation stages. Empowering orientation aims to help poor people develop a clearer understanding of the social, political and economic factors affecting their lives, and to strengthen their awareness of their own potential power to control their lives. There is maximum involvement of the beneficiaries with NGOs acting as facilitators.[23] By level of operation Community-based organizations (CBOs) arise out of people’s own initiatives. They can be responsible for raising the consciousness of the urban poor, helping them to understand their rights in accessing needed services, and providing such services. City-wide organizations include organizations such as chambers of commerce and industry, coalitions of business, ethnic or educational groups, and associations of community organizations. State NGOs include state-level organizations, associations and groups. Some state NGOs also work under the guidance of National and International NGOs. National NGOs include national organizations such as the YMCAs/YWCAs, Bachpan Bachao Andolan, professional associations and similar groups. Some have state and city branches and assist local NGOs. International NGOs range from secular agencies such as Save the Children, SOS Children’s Villages, OXFAM, Ford Foundation, Global march against child labor, and Rockefeller Foundation to religiously motivated groups. They can be responsible for funding local NGOs, institutions and projects and implementing projects.[23] Apart from “NGO”, there are alternative or overlapping terms in use, including: third-sector organization (TSO), non-profit organization (NPO), voluntary organization (VO), civil society organization (CSO), grassroots organization (GO), social movement organization (SMO), private voluntary organization (PVO), self-help organization (SHO) and non-state actors (NSAs). In Portuguese, Spanish, French, Italian and other Romance languages, the ‘mirrored’ abbreviation “ONG” is in use, which has the same meaning as “NGO” (for example Organisation non-gouvernementale in French, Organização Não Governamental in Portuguese, Organización no gubernamental in Spanish, or Organizzazione non governativa in Italian). Governmental-related organizations / non-governmental organizations are a heterogeneous group. As a result, a long list of additional acronyms has developed, including: BINGO: ‘Business-friendly international NGO’ or ‘Big international NGO’ SBO: ‘Social Benefit Organization,’ a positive, goal-oriented designation as a substitute for the negative, “Non-” designations TANGO: ‘Technical assistance NGO’ TSO: ‘Third-sector organization’ GONGO: ‘government-organized non-governmental organization’ or ‘government-operated NGOs’ (set up by governments to look like NGOs in order to qualify for outside aid or promote the interests of government)[24] DONGO: ‘Donor-organized NGO’ INGO: ‘International NGO’ QUANGO: ‘Quasi-autonomous NGO,’ or QUANGO refer to NGOs set up and funded by government. The term is particularly prevalent within the UK (where there are more than 1,200 of them), the Republic of Ireland, and the Commonwealth. National NGO: A non-governmental organization that exists only in one country. This term is rare due to the globalization of non-governmental organizations, which causes an NGO to exist in more than one country.[25] CSO: ‘Civil Society Organization’ ENGO: ‘Environmental NGO,’ such as Greenpeace and WWF NNGO: ‘Northern NGO’ Sparsh NGO: ‘Sparsh NGO,’ such as Non-Governmental Organization PANGO: ‘Party NGO,’ set up by parties and disguised as NGOs to serve their political matters. SNGO: ‘Southern NGO’ SCO: ‘Social change organization’ TNGO: ‘Transnational NGO.’ The term emerged during the 1970s due to the increase of environmental and economic issues in the global community. TNGO includes non-governmental organizations that are not confined to only one country, but exist in two or more countries. GSO: Grassroots Support Organization MANGO: ‘Market advocacy NGO’ NGDO: ‘Non-governmental development organization’ PVDO: ‘Private voluntary development organisation'[26] USAID refers to NGOs as private voluntary organizations.[27] However, many scholars have argued that this definition is highly problematic as many NGOs are in fact state- or corporate-funded and -managed projects and have professional staff.[citation needed] GRO/NGOs exist for a variety of reasons, usually to further the political or social goals of their members or founders. Examples include improving the state of the natural environment, encouraging the observance of human rights, improving the welfare of the disadvantaged, or representing a corporate agenda. However, there are a huge number of such organizations and their goals cover a broad range of political and philosophical positions. This can also easily be applied to private schools and athletic organizations. Track II diplomacy Main article: Track II diplomacy Track II dialogue, or Track II diplomacy, is transnational coordination that involves non-official members of the government including epistemic communities as well as former policy-makers or analysts. Track II diplomacy aims to get policymakers and policy analysts to come to a common solution through discussions by unofficial means. Unlike the Track I diplomacy where government officials, diplomats and elected leaders gather to talk about certain issues, Track II diplomacy consists of experts, scientists, professors and other figures that are not involved in government affairs. The members of Track II diplomacy usually have more freedom to exchange ideas and come up with compromises on their own. Activities There are numerous classifications of NGOs. The typology the World Bank uses divides them into Operational and Advocacy.[28] Generally, NGOs act as implementers, catalysts, and partners. Firstly, NGOs act as implementers in that they mobilize resources in order to provide goods and services to people who are suffering due to a man-made disaster or a natural disaster. Secondly, NGOs act as catalysts in that they drive change. They have the ability to ‘inspire, facilitate, or contribute to improved thinking and action to promote change’. Lastly, NGOs often act as partners alongside other organizations in order to tackle problems and address human needs more effectively.[29] NGOs vary in their methods. Some act primarily as lobbyists, while others primarily conduct programs and activities. For instance, an NGO such as Oxfam, concerned with poverty alleviation, may provide needy people with the equipment and skills to find food and clean drinking water, whereas an NGO like the FFDA helps through investigation and documentation of human rights[citation needed] violations and provides legal assistance to victims of human rights abuses. Others, such as the Afghanistan Information Management Services, provide specialized technical products and services to support development activities implemented on the ground by other organizations. Operational Operational NGOs seek to “achieve small-scale change directly through projects”.[25] They mobilize financial resources, materials, and volunteers to create localized programs. They hold large-scale fundraising events and may apply to governments and organizations for grants or contracts to raise money for projects. They often operate in a hierarchical structure; a main headquarters being staffed by professionals who plan projects, create budgets, keep accounts, and report and communicate with operational fieldworkers who work directly on projects.[25] Operational NGOs deal with a wide range of issues, but are most often associated with the delivery of services or environmental issues, emergency relief, and public welfare. Operational NGOs can be further categorized by the division into relief-oriented versus development-oriented organizations; according to whether they stress service delivery or participation; whether they are religious or secular; and whether they are more public- or private-oriented. Although operational NGOs can be community-based, many are national or international. The defining activity of operational NGOs is the implementation of projects.[25] Campaigning Campaigning NGOs seek to “achieve large-scale change promoted indirectly through influence of the political system”.[25] Campaigning NGOs need an efficient and effective group of professional members who are able to keep supporters informed, and motivated. They must plan and host demonstrations and events that will keep their cause in the media. They must maintain a large informed network of supporters who can be mobilized for events to garner media attention and influence policy changes. The defining activity of campaigning NGOs is holding demonstrations.[25] Campaigning NGOs often deal with issues relating to human rights, women’s rights, and children’s rights. The primary purpose of an Advocacy NGO is to defend or promote a specific cause. As opposed to operational project management, these organizations typically try to raise awareness, acceptance and knowledge by lobbying, press work and activist event.[citation needed] Both operational and campaigning It is not uncommon for NGOs to make use of both activities. Many times, operational NGOs will use campaigning techniques if they continually face the same issues in the field that could be remedied through policy changes. At the same time, Campaigning NGOs, like human rights organizations often have programs that assist the individual victims they are trying to help through their advocacy work.[25] Public relations Non-governmental organizations need healthy relationships with the public to meet their goals. Foundations and charities use sophisticated public relations campaigns to raise funds and employ standard lobbying techniques with governments. Interest groups may be of political importance because of their ability to influence social and political outcomes. A code of ethics was established in 2002 by The World Association of Non Governmental Organizations. Project management There is an increasing awareness that management techniques are crucial to project success in non-governmental organizations.[30] Generally, non-governmental organizations that are private have either a community or environmental focus. They address varieties of issues such as religion, emergency aid, or humanitarian affairs. They mobilize public support and voluntary contributions for aid; they often have strong links with community groups in developing countries, and they often work in areas where government-to-government aid is not possible. NGOs are accepted as a part of the international relations landscape, and while they influence national and multilateral policy-making, increasingly they are more directly involved in local .